Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Summer Math Program

The NEC Native Education College, in partnership with “Eagles of Tomorrow Education Society”, a registered Canadian Charity, will be offering a 2017 Summer Mathematics Program for Aboriginal students currently in Grades 7 – 11 who are transitioning into Grades 8 - 12 in September 2017. I’d like to invite your child to apply to participate in The Summer Mathematics Program to be held at NEC Native Education College (located at 285 East 5th Ave. Vancouver) from Wednesday, July 5 th to Tuesday, August 1 st, 2017. The weekly schedule will be: (Changes may be made when necessary) Monday to Friday: 9:00am - 1:00pm Mathematics / Youth Empowerment / Elders Teachings Children will receive refreshments each day as well as a scholarship of $50 per week for having perfect attendance and strong work habits. The scholarship will be awarded based on attendance and upon successful completion of the work assigned each week. We believe that successful completion of the program will give students an opportunity to build a solid foundation in mathematics which will enable them to graduate from High School with Regular Academic Mathematics.

 AVAILABLE FOR PROGRAM DATES NOTED ABOVE, AND MEETING GRADE REQUIREMENTS BY JUNE 15, 2017

TO: Admissions Office by e-mail: admissions@necvancouver.org by fax: 604-873-1440

Native Youth Program


Contact: nyp@moa.ubc.ca

Monday, June 5, 2017

National Aboriginal Day


What is National Aboriginal Day?

June 21 is National Aboriginal Day. This is a day for all Canadians to recognize and celebrate the unique heritage, diverse cultures and outstanding contributions of First NationsInuit and Métis peoples. The Canadian Constitution recognizes these three groups as Aboriginal peoples, also known as Indigenous Peoples.
Although these groups share many similarities, they each have their own distinct heritage, language, cultural practices and spiritual beliefs.
In cooperation with Indigenous organizations, the Government of Canada chose June 21, the summer solstice, for National Aboriginal Day. For generations, many Indigenous Peoples and communities have celebrated their culture and heritage on or near this day due to the significance of the summer solstice as the longest day of the year.

What led to the creation of National Aboriginal Day?

National Aboriginal Day was announced in 1996 by then Governor General of Canada, Roméo LeBlanc, through the Proclamation Declaring June 21 of Each Year as National Aboriginal Day. National Aboriginal Day was the result of consultations and statements of support for such a day made by various Indigenous groups.
  • in 1995, the Sacred Assembly, a national conference of Indigenous and non-Indigenous people chaired by Elijah Harper, called for a national holiday to celebrate the contributions of Indigenous Peoples
  • also in 1995, the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples recommended the designation of a National First Peoples Day
  • in 1982, the National Indian Brotherhood (now the Assembly of First Nations) called for the creation of National Aboriginal Solidarity Day

How does the Government of Canada support National Aboriginal Day?

National Aboriginal Day is part of the Celebrate Canada program, which also includes Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day (June 24), Canadian Multiculturalism Day (June 27) and Canada Day (July 1).
While all Government of Canada departments support National Aboriginal Day, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) and Canadian Heritage work together to promote it. INAC provides resources and ideas for events, while Canadian Heritage provides funding opportunities for community celebratory events.

Kanata Festival

The Kanata Festival is a 13 day festival running from June 19-July 1st.
It is a cultural festival featuring food, music, art, workshops, and performances.
It takes place on the traditional unceded territory of the Coast Salish people, in Larwill Park, bounded by Cambie & Beatty streets and Georgia and Dunsmuir streets in downtown Vancouver, BC.
While taking place in BC, the festival will feature aspects of Indigenous culture from across Canada.
For regular festival updates and to follow the planning and execution of the festival, please follow us on social media:
Facebook: Kanata Festival
Instagram: @kanatfest
Twitter: @kanatafest

Drum Making Workshop

Drum-making workshop with Phil and Gisele L'Hirondelle!
Join First Nations Elders Phil and Gisele L'Hirondelle for a very special weekend event where we will learn the sacred art of drum making and create our own drums.
Phil Mechuskosis L'Hirondelle
Phil Mechuskosis L’Hirondelle is a Cree Elder who has been a Sundancer since the early 90’s.  He was born in Calgary, Alberta and was trained from age 5 while traveling with his Father.  He has also trained with other elders from his late teens such Chief Robert Smallboy, Wallace Black Elk, Grandfather Vince Stogen, Grandfather Sylvester Joe, Grandmother Mary Uslick and others.  His Eastern influences are: Sri Sri Ravi Shankar, Devananda Saraswati, Ramana Maharishi, Ram Surat Kumar and Master Dhyan Vimal. He brings a unique blend of Aboriginal and Eastern tradition to his present day Sacred Work teachings.  He works with his wife Gisèle of Mi’kmaq and Acadian heritage (Blue Heartstone Flicker Woman) and together they have a wide variety of programs and ceremonies.
Phil also works at the Native Education College in the capacity of Elder and also brings workshops and teachings and Elders in the Vancouver Community Colleges, Downtown and Broadway campuses, and also at Capilano University. He is also active in the Lower Mainland bringing ceremonies, teachings and workshops in the community. 
Phil also worked as an Aboriginal Liaison Officer at Kwikwexwelhp Healing Village working side by side with elder’s Robert Nahanee, Grandmother Rita Leon, and Helen Joe. He is presently an Elder and Programs Officer for Corrections Canada medium security in the Lower Mainland.
Gisèle L'Hirondelle - Blue Heartstone Flicker Woman
Gisèle L’Hirondelle, also known as Blue Heartstone Flicker Woman, was born in New Brunswick in the Acadian Peninsula. She has Mi’kmaq heritage on her Mother’s side. She moved to Vancouver BC in April of 1985 to start a new life with her two children. She has a background in marketing and for the last 10 years, in Human Resources. She is now involved with Friends To Mankind and the School of Mastery, which are based on Master Dhyan Vimal’s teachings.
Phil and Gisèle got married in June 2000 and they have been working together doing Native Teachings and ceremonies since the mid 90’s. Gisèle has been involved in crafts all her life; it is her passion and her meditation. She is well known for her ribbon shirts, ribbon dresses, sweat dresses, bundle mats, and her unique drum bags amongst many other things. You can find her drum bags all over the world. She also loves teaching others how to make their own drum, dream catthers and rattles.
Honour fee: $150, plus $10 donation to the Soul Mind Body Centre
IMPORTANT NOTE: All registrations must be made in person at the Centre, via cash or cheque ONLY. Please reserve your place BEFORE JUNE 10TH, to avoid workshop cancelation.
This workshop is available in person only. There will be no webcast.

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

FNESC Summer Institute

Learning First Peoples Summer Institute for Teachers

August 21-24, 2017
Sheraton Vancouver Airport Hotel
7551 Westminster Highway, Richmond, BC
The Learning First Peoples Summer Institute is designed to support educators to bring quality, authentic First Peoples teaching and learning into BC classrooms.
Comprised of three different sessions, which can be selected individually, the sessions will introduce resources that focus on themes, issues and topics of importance to First Peoples learning and informed by the First Peoples Principles of Learning. Each session will include print resources, activities and opportunities for professional dialogue and networking.
For questions, please contact Riannon Nahanee toll-free 1-877-422-3672 riannonn@fnesc.ca
  • English First Peoples, Grades 10-12, August 21-22, 2017 (two days) $30
  • Residential Schools and Reconciliation Teacher Resource Guide (Elem/Sec), August 23, 2017 $30
  • Science First Peoples Grades 5-9 First Peoples, August 24, 2017  $30
If your preferred session/s fills to capacity, email the event administrator to be waitlisted.
Eligibility to Attend
First Nations school, public school and independent school teachers are invited to attend.
Registration Fees
Credit card and cheque are accepted. All registration fees must be paid by August 1st or the registration will be cancelled.
Cheques: If paying by cheque please send the cheque with a copy of the registration confirmation payable to First Nations Education Steering Committee c/o CivicInfo Mail to: CivicInfo BC, #203 – 4475 Viewmont Avenue, Victoria BC, V8Z 6L8.
Daily Schedule
Breakfast 8:30 am; Session 9:00 am to 3:00 pm (breakfast and lunch provided)
Venue and Accommodation
Sheraton Vancouver Airport Hotel, 7551 Westminster Highway, Richmond. Reservations: (604) 273-7878
Book by July 20, 2017 quoting FNESC Workshop Summer Institute for the negotiated rate of $209+tx. Space is limited – please book early!
Travel Reimbursement
Travel/hotel reimbursement is available only to teachers from BC First Nations schools, maximum 3 per school, per session.
Please mail your travel claim to FNESC post-marked within 30 days of the event to be eligible for reimbursement. You must include original receipts for hotel, ferry, airplane, taxi, bus and parking.
A travel claim form will be provided at the event a sample Travel Claim Form – April 2017 is available for reference (rates subject to change). A summary of FNESC policies is on the reverse of the form.
When you register online, you will receive an automatic email confirming your registration.
You will only be reimbursed for “most economical” mode of travel.
Individuals eligible for travel reimbursement living more than one hour or 90 km from the event location can apply for hotel reimbursed at the negotiated rate.
Please do not claim breakfasts or lunches on the meeting day because they are provided.
Have a safe trip and thank you for your participation!

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

National Aboriginal Day


NAISA Conference, June, 2017

From June 22 to 24, 2017, the University of British Columbia and its co-hosts will welcome NAISA, the largest scholarly organization devoted to Indigenous issues and research, to UBC’s Vancouver campus on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territory of the Musqueam Nation.

To get a feel for UBC, Vancouver, and the rich local history of Indigenous activism and arts, watch our conference trailer. Follow the tabs above for logistics and other information, and watch this space for regular updates as the conference approaches. We look forward to seeing you in Vancouver in June!
In this place and territory, we honour our commitments to ethical relationships and rigorous exchange of ideas that further the aims and sovereignties of Indigenous individuals, communities, and nations and the goals of NAISA as a scholarly organization. As the host committee, we are seeking to create a space that is free from harassment and violence, physical or otherwise. We ask for your support in this, and we take our direction from the First Nations House of Learning’s mandate which follows the Longhouse Teachings of Respect, Relationships, Responsibility, and Reverence. All of this is in keeping with longstanding protocols, relationships, and commitments established here. We hope attendees come with a generous spirit, a deep sense of ethics, and a genuine enthusiasm for the work we will all be doing together.
To register:
http://naisa2017.arts.ubc.ca/registration/

Monday, May 8, 2017

BCTF Reconciliation Activities

Just a reminder of Spring Reconciliation activities coming up for you to participate in.  Please see below for some ideas and see First Nations Child & Family Caring Society link https://fncaringsociety.com/events-make-difference for more information.
Bear Witness Day, to take place May 10, encourages individuals of all ages to honour Jordan’s Principle implementation by bringing their teddy bears to daycare, school or work. This year marks 10 years since Jordan’s Principle was unanimously passed in the House of Commons, and last year the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal ordered the federal government to fully implement Jordan's Principle by May 10th, 2016. With another year passed, First Nations children continue to face discrimination in accessing government services on the same terms as other kids. Anyone can show their support and “Bear Witness” to Jordan’s Principle by hosting a “bear birthday party”, coffee break or lunch to learn more about Jordan’s Principle and to honour Jordan River Anderson. Photos of Bear Witness events can be shared on social media, including the Bear Witness Facebook event page (https://www.facebook.com/events/1272485976133090/) using the hashtag #JordansPrinciple.
Honouring Memories, Planting Dreams (HMPD), which is celebrated annually in May and June, invites people of all ages to join in reconciliation by planting heart gardens in their communities. Heart gardens honour residential school Survivors and their families, as well as the legacy of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. Heart gardens can be indoors or outdoors; they can include decorated paper hearts and/or real flowers and medicines. Each heart that is planted represents the memory of a child lost to the residential school system, and the act of planting represents that individual’s commitment to finding their place in reconciliation. You can find out more and register your event at honouringmemoriesplantingdreams.ca.
heart butterfly   IMG_2055   IMG_2056    IMG_2057 IMG_2060
Our Dreams Matter Too (ODMT) is an annual walk and letter writing event that takes place in June to support culturally based equity for First Nations children. First Nations children get less funding than other children for services like education, health and child welfare and this makes it hard for them to achieve their dreams and grow up proud of who they are. ODMT is an opportunity to encourage children, youth, families, schools and organizations to write letters to their MP and the Prime Minister supporting culturally based equity for First Nations children, and to organize a walk to a mail box in their community. ODMT highlights the importance of reconciliation and that every child matters no matter where they come from! You can find out more and register your event at ourdreamsmattertoo.ca.
At the Caring Society, we believe that meaningful reconciliation engages people of all ages in learning about Indigenous child rights in Canada. Our spring reconciliation activities provide individuals and organizations with the opportunities they need to make a difference, in fun and creative ways. We hope that you can join us by taking part this spring!
If you have any questions or require any resources, please do not hesitate to contact me.
Gail Stromquist
Assistant Director, Aboriginal Education
Professional and Social Issues Department BCTF
100-550 West 6th Avenue
Vancouver, BC V5Z 4P2
gstromquist@bctf.ca
604-871-1854
cid:86AAAE56-9C02-4B00-893C-1669DBCFA251@bctfmain.priv

Thursday, April 20, 2017

BCTF Residential School Resource, The Gladys We Never Knew

The Gladys We Never Knew (The life of a child in a BC Indian Residential School)  ebook is now online!
Please see the link below and click on the “What’s New?” tile to access the Gladys ebook.



_______________________________________________________
Miranda Light, Administrative Assistant
Professional & Social Issues Division
Aboriginal Education & Peer Support Services
BC Teachers’ Federation 100-550 West 6th Ave.,
Vancouver, BC  V5Z 4P2
e: mlight@bctf.ca, web: www.bctf.ca
d: 604-871-1807, TF: 1-800-663-9163, (1807)
cid:16C79898-ABC3-445E-9BA5-B729D9D581C5@bctfmain.privml:tfeu

Friday, April 7, 2017

FNESC workshops

Science First Peoples and Indian Residential Schools and Reconciliation

REGISTRATION is now open for two more workshops in our Learning First Peoples Series.
  1. Science First Peoples Workshop (Grades 5-9), MAY 5, 2017, Vancouver
  2. Indian Residential Schools and Reconciliation Workshop (Elementary and Secondary), MAY 26, 2017, Vancouver
These full-day workshops are designed for BC teachers to support them to teach about First Peoples in informed and appropriate ways.
Representatives from BC First Nations schools may claim travel reimbursement.
For online registration and full details, please visit http://www.fnesc.ca/events-lfp/

Monday, February 20, 2017

REEL Canada

Hi Teachers,

I'm writing because REEL CANADA has a special FREE opportunity for schools in the Vancouver area next month:

A screening of the award-winning documentary film Angry Inuk (dir. Alethea Arnaquq-Baril, 2016) followed by a presentation and in-person Q & A session with special guest and director Alethea Arnaquq-Baril!

This free Indigenous themed event, presented by REEL CANADA as part of the Beyond 150 Years: An Acknowledgement of Cinematic Territory film festival in partnership with Vancouver International Film Festival, is being offered to high school schools on Monday, March 6th, 2017

We also offer free lesson plans about the film for teachers to use before and/or after the film screenings.

I've attached a formal invitation to this email for you to read more about this exciting opportunity.

Please let me know ASAP, as spaces are limited, if your school is interested in participating in this exciting day: 1-855-733-5709 ext. 203

Thanks and I look forward to hearing back from you!

Cheers,
Stephanie


Stephanie Turenko, B.Ed
Production Coordinator
REEL CANADA

Ask Me About:
April 19, 2017
@canfilmday #CanFilmDay 

504-720 Bathurst Street, Toronto, ON M5S 2R4
416-642-5796 | Toll-free: 1-855-733-5709 

VIFF Aboriginal Films

Join us for two upcoming high school screenings of the following Aboriginal films:
COLONIZATION ROAD (February 23, 2017 at 10am)
Michelle St. John, 2016, Canada, 49 mins
$8/student 
Email Cecelia Cheung at education@viff.org to book 

In towns throughout Ontario, there are startling reminders of the colonization of Indigenous territories and the displacement of First Nations people. Anishinaabe comedian and activist Ryan McMahon takes us to his hometown of Fort Frances and down its main drag, which is called Colonization Road. Similar streets have similar names in towns and cities across the province, direct reminders of the Public Lands Act of 1853 and its severe impact on First Nations, their treaties and their land in the name of "Canadian settlement." On his journey through Ontario, McMahon explores the history of these roads, meets with settlers in solidarity and raises significant questions about "reconciliation" and what it means to "decolonize."

ANGRY INUK (March 6, 2017 at 9am)
Alethea Arnaquq-Baril, 2016, Canada, 85 mins
FREE screening
Email Stephanie Turenko at stephanie@reelcanada.ca to reserve seats

Seal hunting, a critical part of Inuit life, has been controversial for a long time. Now, a new generation of Inuit, armed with social media and their own sense of humour and justice, are challenging the anti-sealing groups and bringing their own voices into the conversation. Director Alethea Arnaquq-Baril joins her fellow Inuit activists as they challenge outdated perceptions of Inuit and present themselves to the world as a modern people in dire need of a sustainable economy. 
We look forward to having your class with us!

Cecelia Cheung
VIFF Education Coordinator

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Stanley Park Ecology

Indigenous Plant Use

February 25 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Walk through the forest with an experienced guide of Coast Salish descent and learn about the traditional and present-day indigenous relationships with local flora and fauna. While there will be no collecting on these tours, Stanley Park offers a perfect setting to learn about sustainable harvesting. Join us on this walking tour to nurture yourself with nature and harmonize your well-being with the natural world.
We meet at the Stanley Park Nature House and will begin promptly!

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Nominations for P.H. Bryce Award

REMINDER: Less than one week left to nominate a young person (or group) in your circle for the 2017 PH Bryce Award! We know that children and youth across Canada are doing amazing things to make this country better place, and we want to honour their efforts. Nomination deadline is February 15, 2017. Visit our website for more details: https://fncaringsociety.com/peter-bryce-award

A big thank you to our friends at United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) for the amazing graphic!


In recognition of Canada's 150th anniversary, we are pleased to announce a special 2017 call for nominations for the PH Bryce Award for Children and Youth. As Canada approaches its 150 birthday, we still have a long way to go to ensure for equity for First Nations kids and their families. We know that children and youth are doing amazing things to make Canada a better place, and their efforts inspire and uplift us all.
Award nominees must show how they have overcame challenges to stand up for the rights of First Nations, Métis and Inuit children, for example, speaking in public about the rights of Indigenous children even when you are a bit scared of talking in front of groups. Although the nominee(s) might be working to help one child or one community, it is important to show how these efforts could help other First Nations, Métis and Inuit children. 

Deadline extended! Submissions are due at by 12 noon Eastern Time on February 15th, 2017.

About the Award

The Peter Henderson Bryce Award is awarded every two years on a rotating basis (alternating between the child/youth and adult categories). Named for courageous health advocate Dr. Peter Henderson Bryce, the award recognizes outstanding leadership in promoting the safety, health or well-being of First Nations, Métis and Inuit children and youth. Learn more about Dr. Bryce.
The selection committee comprises members of the Bryce family, as well as representatives from the Canadian Paediatric Society, the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society and experts in the field of child rights and health.

2016 P. H. Bryce Award (Adult)

Renowned Abenaki filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin is the recipient of the 2016 Peter Bryce, M.D. Award for Excellence in Public Health Advocacy for First Nations, Métis and Inuit children and youth. Through her creative lens, Alanis gives Indigenous peoples the chance to share their stories, sheds light on injustices, and calls for redress on issues that impact the health and well-being of children. The P.H. Bryce Award acknowledges her work to improve the lives of Indigenous children and shift the hearts and minds of Canadians from a position of indifference to one of reconciliation. Read Alanis's full profile
Honourable mentions for the 2016 award include Dr. Anna Banerji of the University of Toronto, and Dr. Lola Baydala, pediatrician and associate professor with the University of Alberta. Read Dr. Banerji's and Dr. Baydala's profiles.


Thank you,

Gail Stromquist
Assistant Director, Aboriginal Education
Professional and Social Issues Department BCTF
100-550 West 6th Avenue
Vancouver, BC V5Z 4P2
gstromquist@bctf.ca
604-871-1854
cid:86AAAE56-9C02-4B00-893C-1669DBCFA251@bctfmain.priv

Free Film Screening

Hi Teachers,

I'm writing because REEL CANADA has a special FREE opportunity for schools in the Vancouver area next month:

A screening of the award-winning documentary film Angry Inuk (dir. Alethea Arnaquq-Baril, 2016) followed by a presentation and in-person Q & A session with special guest and director Alethea Arnaquq-Baril!

This free Indigenous themed event, presented by REEL CANADA as part of the Beyond 150 Years: An Acknowledgement of Cinematic Territory film festival in partnership with Vancouver International Film Festival, is being offered to high school schools on Monday, March 6th, 2017

We also offer free lesson plans about the film for teachers to use before and/or after the film screenings.

I've attached a formal invitation to this email for you to read more about this exciting opportunity.

Please let me know ASAP, as spaces are limited, if your school is interested in participating in this exciting day: 1-855-733-5709 ext. 203

Thanks and I look forward to hearing back from you!

Cheers,
Stephanie


Stephanie Turenko, B.Ed
Production Coordinator
REEL CANADA

Ask Me About:
April 19, 2017
@canfilmday #CanFilmDay 

504-720 Bathurst Street, Toronto, ON M5S 2R4
416-642-5796 | Toll-free: 1-855-733-5709 

Monday, February 6, 2017

Coastal First Nations Dance Festival

The Coastal First Nations Dance Festival returns to MOA from March 4-6, 2017. Produced by the Dancers of Damelahamid in partnership with MOA, the tenth anniversary of this event will showcase the diverse and rich cultural traditions practiced by a selection of some of the best artists from coastal British Columbia, the Yukon, as well as national and international guest artists. Throughout the festival, the museum’s Great Hall will be transformed into a celebration of Indigenous cultures and dance traditions.

Signature Evening Performances — Ticketed Events
Friday, March 3 — 7:30 pm
Saturday, March 4 — 7:30 pm
Doors open at 7 pm
$30 adults / $25 students, seniors, MOA members
Buy Tickets

Festival Performances
Saturday, March 4 — 1-4 pm
Sunday, March 5 — 1-4 pm
Free with MOA admission

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Talking Stick Festival

http://fullcircle.ca/outreach/workshops-in-schools/



Workshops in Schools consist of storytelling, performing and visual arts workshops and classes programmed directly into schools and community centres in areas where many members of the Aboriginal community reside. Each workshop session is designed to emphasize interaction, participation, dialogue and education in a lively, creative environment. $150 for workshops.


Full Circle currently offers the following: 
PRIMARY & ELEMENTARY SCHOOL


• Storytelling
• Métis Jigging
• Powwow Dancing
• West Coast Singing and Dancing • Hip-Hop Beat Making
• TSF Colouring Contest
Subject to change.

SECONDARY SCHOOL / YOUTH
• Hip-Hop Beat Making/ DJ Mixing
• Master Class Slam Poetry (8 weeks) • Slam Poetry Introduction
• Vocal Lessons
• Visual Arts
• TSF Poster Design Contest
For complete Workshops in Schools Guide, visit www.fullcircle.ca 

How to Register
To register, contact us with the following information:
• The name of your school
• Your name and time of the workshop you

will be attending
• The total number of students that will be

attending
Email: education@fullcircle.ca or phone: 604-683-0497

Registration Deadline
Last day to register is Monday, Feb 6, 2017.
Workshops have a limited capacity and early registration is highly recommended. Due to safety, we regret we are unable to accommodate any requests for increased session size. Please see our Workshops in Schools Guide online
at www.fullcircle.ca for session capacity and requirements.

Questions or Further Information?
Please call 604-683-0497, or email us at: education@fullcircle.ca
The Workshops in School Series is part of the programming of The Talking Stick Festival and designed under the guidelines of the Aboriginal Enhancement Agreement.